What is The Difference Between Golf Vs Hunting Rangefinders

Rangefinders have become a popular piece of technology in multiple different areas. Two of the most common consumer uses for rangefinders are golfing and hunting. Despite the fact that these devices are used to find range in both activities, rangefinders for both activities are designed specifically for that activity. What makes the rangefinders different? We are going to take a moment today to take a look at the difference between golfing rangefinders and hunting rangefinders so you can purchase the right device.

Golf Vs Hunting Rangefinders

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Functional Differences in Rangefinders

Both rangefinders use the same type of laser but they don’t use the information gathered the same way. When golfing your rangefinder is used to detect a specific object within a relatively close range. Think a reflective marker on top of a hole flag. In order to see that it uses the idea that the closest object must be the one that you are looking for. This is called first target mode.

In addition to first target mode, a golf rangefinder does not require a precise range. You are looking to determine a rough distance so you know which club to pick and how far to hit the ball. When golfing you don’t need to know much over 400 yards, if you need to know that far.

On the other hand, a hunting rangefinder assumes that you are looking for something at distance, in the woods. It looks for the target at range and ignores everything up close to you. The most common hunting occurs in the woods after all.

A rangefinder for hunting needs to be accurate at further distances than a golf rangefinder. Accuracy on most hunting range finders extends to at least 1,000 yards and some go out to 1,500 yards. The only form of hunting where you do not need a rangefinder that accurate is when you are hunting with a bow. Then for functionality purposes, a golf rangefinder might work.

Feature Differences in Rangefinders

Differences in features are another thing to consider when it comes to which rangefinder is right for which task. Let’s take a look at some feature differences between golfing and hunting rangefinders.

Moving vs. Stationary Target

When you are out hunting you would be extremely lucky if your target never moved. Almost all animals move at least a little. Many hunting rangefinders are capable of tracking a moving target. They can even do so with relatively good precision. Gathering distances in golfing doesn’t require the device to take movement into account. The rangefinder takes a distance to the closest object and calls it good.

Durability of Design

Durability wise, hunting rangefinders tend to take the win. When you are out hunting you are in the wilderness and far more exposed to the elements. The rangefinders for hunting are typically designed to put up with all of the trials you put them through as you go venturing.

Golfing rangefinders tend to be pretty durable too. Just not as durable. During a golfing game, you may be exposed to the elements but not for nearly as long. Plus you aren’t staying in a tent or tree stand when you are golfing.

Targeting Modes

The targeting mode for golfing rangefinders tends to be a standard mode. You look for one target and it gives you the feedback such as range and maybe windage. You can switch between different range measurements but that is about it. Hunting rangefinders have much more detailed applications. They allow users to get targeting features for pros, beginners, and everywhere in between. Depending on the rangefinder you get for hunting, the number of targeting modes available can vary greatly.

Price of Rangefinders

Rangefinders can come in a wide variety of prices. The quality and manufacturer of the device that you look at will have a significant impact on the cost of the device. A higher-quality brand and a device with more features will naturally cost you more.

The Cost of a Golf Rangefinder

A golfing rangefinder is typically not that high. You can get them starting around $100 and the cost goes up from there. Typically golfers spring for a midrange golf rangefinder. Some rangefinders for golfing can get up to the $400-500 range.

The Cost of a Hunting Rangefinder

A good hunting rangefinder can be found for about the same price as an entry golfing rangefinder. Sometimes even less. Hunting rangefinders aren’t used for that long during every hunt. They don’t need to be able to stay on for minutes at a time or to be used every hole. The most expensive hunting rangefinders can typically be found for somewhere between $300 and $350.

Picking A Rangefinder

The most important thing to consider when you are picking a rangefinder is the purpose of your rangefinder. In almost all cases you don’t want to buy a golfing rangefinder for hunting and vise versa. This will help to ensure that you get the features, targeting acquisition, and targeting modes that you expect.

After the purpose, you will want to consider quality. A good quality rangefinder will typically be something that you want to invest in. You want to be able to trust it when you need it. The last thing you want is to be out on the course or out hunting and not be able to get a range. When we talk about quality we are also meaning reliability because the two go hand-in-hand.

The last major thing you will want to consider is the durability of the rangefinder. Most people want to invest in a rangefinder that will last them for a good while. Plus you need to consider the average whether that you are going to expose the device to. If you live in an area with unusually inclement weather or are going to hunt in one, you will want to buy a rangefinder that can handle that.

Rangefinders are used for more than just golfing and hunting though. When you go to make a purchase, make sure that you are picking one that is designed for your needs. It is also typically a good idea to familiarize yourself with the use and test the device before you get out into the field. You want to be ready before showtime, whether you are golfing or hunting.

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